Obituary: Stan Faraday 1941-2020

He photographed the Queen, built a thriving taxi business in Maitland and ran the bistro at the Gresford Hotel.

And that's just a tiny snippet of the life Stan Faraday led.

The humble and generous 78-year-old is being remembered for his inspirational 'can do' attitude after his sudden death on January 22.

"He was an entrepreneur in his own right, he always held his head high and offered encouragement," his son-in-law John Stevenson said.

"He would do anything for anybody, he would always put others before himself," his daughter Debbie Wilson added.

Mr Faraday came to Australia as a child from Manchester, in England, with his parents and two younger siblings. They lived in Perth before a job opportunity in Raymond Terrace brought them to the Hunter region.

Mr Faraday became a letterpress printer before he embarked on a career as a freelance photographer.

That role put him on the tarmac when Queen Elizabeth II and her husband Prince Philip arrived at Williamtown RAAF Base as part of their 1970 royal tour. His pictures, and byline, were published in the Port Stephens Examiner.

ROYAL VISIT: Stan Faraday's picture of Queen Elizabeth II at Williamtown RAAF Base.

ROYAL VISIT: Stan Faraday's picture of Queen Elizabeth II at Williamtown RAAF Base.

He had already met the love of his life - in High Street Maitland, by then. He married Maureen Elliot in 1962 and they had two daughters, Debbie and Kelly.

He went on to run two businesses at once - Red and White Star Taxis, now known as Maitland Taxis, and a mail contracting service.

He had Australia Post contracts in Clarence Town, Rosebrook and Pokolbin where he delivered mail direct to rural areas through the roadside mailbox delivery service.

He would drop the mail for suburban residents at the post office for another contractor to distribute. He also transported wine from Pokolbin vineyards to Maitland. He continued these contracts for 14 years.

DELIVERY: Stan Faraday delivered mail through the roadside mailbox service. He also transported wine from Pokolbin vineyards to Maitland.

DELIVERY: Stan Faraday delivered mail through the roadside mailbox service. He also transported wine from Pokolbin vineyards to Maitland.

Mr Faraday started his taxi venture with three vehicles in 1971. He drove the taxis before stepping into a managerial role. He also worked at the base taking customer calls.

"He was very proud of his taxis, I can still hear him answering the phone saying 'Stan Faraday Red and White Taxis proprietor'," Ms Wilson said.

Mr Faraday also developed his culinary skills with a commercial cookery course at Metford TAFE. He used those skills to run the bistro at the Gresford Hotel for two years.

"He wanted to cook for a large number of people and offer people amazing food. It was not hard work for him, it was love," Mr Stevenson said.

TAXIS: One of the vehicles Stan Faraday used to operate his Red and White Star Taxis business.

TAXIS: One of the vehicles Stan Faraday used to operate his Red and White Star Taxis business.

"He loved cooking, he loved soccer and he adored his girls," his wife Maureen added.

When he sold the taxi business and tried to retire in 1989 a friend convinced him to take on the Rest A While Caravan Park in Gilgandra, near Dubbo.

He spent 10 years there before moving to Dubbo to retire.

"He was very proud of the park and very honoured to have such a nice place for people to visit," Mr Stevenson said.

"He liked the fact that people came there to have a holiday and he enjoyed meeting them and having a chat."

Mr Faraday soon ventured out of retirement in Dubbo, this time as a delivery driver for Earlyrise Baking Company. He delivered bakery goods to Franklins and IGA supermarkets, as well as corner stores, in several towns around Dubbo for many years.

He also put his culinary skills to work in the bakery and helped create a Kangaroo Jack flavoured pie, which took out the game section at the Great Aussie Meat Pie competition.

"He loved a good pie or sausage roll," Mr Stevenson said.

Mr Faraday enjoyed fishing and often took his family on beach holidays along the coast.

His daughter Kelly Stevenson has fond memories of holidays at Hawks Nest and Forster.

"I was always where he was. I was up there fishing with him off the wharf. We used to go beach fishing on Stockton Beach ... I remember catching more fish than he did," she said.

MEMORIES: A portrait of Stan Faraday later in life.

MEMORIES: A portrait of Stan Faraday later in life.

"Dad did everything for me. He always had my back. Nothing was ever a problem for him."

Mr Faraday's sister-in-law Margaret Padberg said her late husband Pat had a special bond with him.

"We used to do a lot of four-wheel driving and camping and fishing. He was my favourite brother-in-law. He was a people's person, he had great people skills," she said.

"Pat and dad were like brothers, they were very close and they argued like brothers. When Stan was doing photography Pat was doing it too. Margaret was in the laundry helping Pat develop his pictures and mum was helping dad with his pictures. They were both in the taxis together too," Ms Wilson added.

"Margaret and Pat, and mum and dad, were inseparable - what one would do the four of them would do."

A funeral service will be held at 10.30am on Friday, January 31, at the Dubbo City Crematorium on Moffatt Drive in Dubbo.

This story What a life: royalty, taxis and a bistro king first appeared on The Maitland Mercury.

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