Dungog council to crack down on roadside car sales

WARNING: Council is about to crack down on cars "for sale" parked on the roadside - a practice, while commonplace, that is not strictly legal. Photo: Dungog Council.
WARNING: Council is about to crack down on cars "for sale" parked on the roadside - a practice, while commonplace, that is not strictly legal. Photo: Dungog Council.

Dungog Shire Council has put vehicle owners on notice over the use of road reserves for displaying cars for sale. 

The council has issued warnings to the owners of six vehicles parked in locations in Dungog and Paterson in the past week.

The action follows a recent increase in cars, boats and other vehicles being advertised for sale in prominent locations in Dungog and Paterson.

According to Council’s Manager Environmental Services, Paul Minett, parking of vehicles on public land to advertise their sale, whilst traditionally common place, is not strictly legal.

“Council is advising the owners of vehicles that are parked for sale on public land to remove them and pursue other means of advertising,” Mr Minett said.

“This is because the display of advertisements on public land is not permitted without development consent. In most cases, vehicles are also not parked in accordance with the road rules such as being not close and parallel to the roadside or facing the wrong direction.”

Mr Minett said the council regularly receives complaints from residents about vehicles for sale on the side of the road and in parks with concerns usually relating  to their appearance and dangerous conditions caused for traffic. 

“Of major concern is that vehicles for sale are usually placed in prominent, busy locations so as to get the most exposure, so this usually means that potential buyers are pulling off the road and parking in these busy locations causing potential traffic hazards,” he said.

“Residents also complain about the appearance of pop-up caryards in their neighbourhoods.”

Whilst it is possible that people who park vehicles for the purpose of advertising can be fined up to $3000, Mr Minett said the council would prefer to work with vehicle owners by issuing warnings and requests to move the vehicle.

“In this day and age with so many free advertising options available for vehicle sales it seems unnecessary to use public land in an illegal and unsafe manner to sell your car or boat or caravan,” said Mr Minett.

“We are encouraging people to do the right thing and find other options.”

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