Dungog's teardrops of remembrance

Working on the final stages of the poppy display are, clockwise from left, Judy Kennedy, Lorna Johnson, Lorraine Walker and Ruth Leslie.

Working on the final stages of the poppy display are, clockwise from left, Judy Kennedy, Lorna Johnson, Lorraine Walker and Ruth Leslie.

More than 300 Dungog area men and one woman enlisted to serve in World War 1 and they have all been remembered and named on a giant display sheet.

The 5000 Poppies Project was only happening in other places around Australia and New Zealand until August last year but then it came to Dungog with a small group of crafty women embracing the project of remembrance for those who served in World War 1.

Later this month Australia will commemorate the Anzac Centenary, marking 100 years since Australia’s involvement in the First World War.

The initial aim of the 5000 Poppies project is to “plant” a massive field of handmade poppies in Federation Square, Melbourne on Anzac Day as a stunning visual tribute to Australian servicemen and women for more than a century of service in all wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations. 

But the project has been localised and the crocheted and knitted poppies will be displayed at the rededication of the World War 1 Krupp field at Dungog RSL Club on April 18.

Lorraine Walker and friends have been running a little craft group on the first Thursday of each month in the Anglican Church hall.

“Some knit, others crochet, it’s whatever you would like to do for a couple of hours,” she said.

“But the main thing is friendship and getting out of the house.

“We started on the project  in August last year and our aim was to make 400 poppies. That has now grown to around 600.

“Marie Neilson searched the World War 1 honour boards in the shire and came up with 311 local people who served.

“We have made enough poppies for every local Digger who served as well as extras to make a large teardrop on the display.

“After the rededication ceremony it will be used on the altar at the church.”

Some people made a single poppy as a remembrance for a family member, while others made a large quantity and gave to the group.

Just before Christmas the group didn’t think they would have enough poppies so  they have all been madly knitting and crocheting so there would be sufficient to make a giant teardrop.

“It was Sandie Helyer and Roslyn Hooke who came up with the idea of the teardrop,” Lorraine said.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop